A Guide To Decluttering Responsibly

So, where does that leave those of us who have tons of these tapes at home and no way to use them? That’s the question I posed to Tracy McCubbin—a professional organizer who takes an eco-minded approach to decluttering.

Whenever she works with clients who have tons of old VHS tapes (pretty often, it turns out), the first thing she has them do is separate them into two piles: Home videos and commercial tapes of movies, shows, etc.

Home videos can be brought into the 21st century and digitized through services like Costco or LegacyBox. That second category, however, can be resold—and you might be surprised by how much money you can get for it. “Interestingly, there’s a little bit of a market for the produced tapes right now,” says McCubbin, who notes that they’ve become a collector’s item for those who still have working VCR players, even though these officially stopped being sold back in 2016.

I believed it when I saw it. I spotted a VHS tape of the 90s kid classic Air Bud during a recent trip to my local vintage shop, and a scroll through eBay revealed that some people are willing to pay upwards of $100 for untouched VHS tapes of classic movies like Air Bud.

Here are a few places to look into selling. You can also batch your lower-value VHS tapes in a bundle and sell them that way to quickly get all of them off your hands and make a few dollars doing it.

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